The Power of Tech to Amplify Art – Brought to you by Hyundai Motor Company

The Power of Tech to Amplify Art – Brought to you by Hyundai Motor Company


It is a very exciting moment at the Serpentine
because we decided to put technology and science center stage to really explore the relationship
between art and technology. My name is Hans Ulrich Obrist, Im the Artistic Director of the Serpentine
Galleries, we are here at the gallery in Kensington Gardens and we are preparing tomorrow’s
opening of Hito Steyerl. I started in the nineties to curate exhibitions. My first exhibition happened in my kitchen, so
I’ve often curated exhibitions in unusual locations. I then joined the Serpentine in 2006. We are a Kunsthalle, as an exhibition venue without a collection for almost known
for producing and making exhibitions but it became important with the new experiments
in art and technology also to do apps, to do basically digital commissions. We believe that the Serpentine
is here for everyone. We are in a park, the park is here for everyone
and we want our exhibitions there to be for everyone. We need to grow with art to the people. The Serpentine is not the museum,
the Serpentine is a Kunsthalle, it’s a laboratory for new ideas,
it’s a laboratory which of course in the centre of its mission is art
to be with artist. If you want to understand the forces
which are effective in art in the twenty first century it’s important
to understand what’s happening in science, what’s happening in music, what’s happening in
literature, what’s happening in architecture and so what we really do is to explore
all these intersections and work with the artist very closely to connect them
to these other disciplines. Technology definitely plays a vital role
in terms of how far we can stretch our message, how widely we can inspire audiences
with the urgency of art and architecture today. How can we take this platform
that we have which is the most visited destination for architecture in the world
and actually give an opportunity to a new creative and so what we are really excited about as
we look ahead is a program we launched this year in AR to enable an augmented reality
of a city to thrive because we’re really trying
to break the hierarchies of the visual arts and to think about how can we ensure that our message
is heard so far beyond the museum walls. Exhibitions have to be extraordinary experiences
and that is often to do with an experience you haven’t made before. I’ve always been very excited from the beginning
of the practice to actually have conversations with artist, find out what our projects
they have not been able to realise within the parameters of art institutions, galleries
and often artists have extraordinary projects. The idea is that by actually researching them
we can then maybe also have to realise that to help to make these artist feel in control. I always thought that was
an interesting aspect of my work. One of the questions we ask ourselves
everyday here at the Serpentine is how does technology
allow more accessibility to art? Cedric Price, the great architect
together with Joan Littlewood the pioneer of theatre, street theatre,
famously said; Technology is the answer but what is the question?
and I think that is where artists come in, you know artist come with these questions
and that’s when it becomes relevant. Their exhibition is about a common experience
for someone else, with someone else, so we don’t want to be isolated. That’s why it’s interesting that now
it goes really much more towards mixed reality and Hito’s exhibition will be very much
about mixed reality because he will have the digital experience of the app but then you’re
invited to actually go on a physical walk and explore the city and explore the theme
of Hito’s exhibition so the twenty first century is about mixed reality.

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